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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNBC
Jan 14, 2013 6:00pm EST
situation, downsizing. craig in washington, craig? >> caller: jim, boo-yah. >> boo-yah. >> caller: hey, i love you brother. >> what's shaking? >> caller: mmr holdings. >> interesting, because all of those stocks are moving up from japan. i'm not going to fight that. i've been buying ewj, that means i think it represents japan. that's where i prefer you to be. that, ladies and gentlemen, is the conclusion of the lightning round. >> announcer: coming up, win with wireless? there's a spat of new stocks on the street and many more coming in 2013 from cutting edge next generation wi-fi to cruise lines. has your ship finally come in? or will there be a disconnect? cramer's breaking down what it takes for these stocks to tick up just ahead. taking control of your financial destiny is smart. but why would you go it alone? >> something that has a much larger bearing on you as the stock market. >> announcer: let cramer be your guide, your sounding board. >> i'm having a hard time with my favorite stock. >> announcer: and your coach on the road to financial independence. "mad money" week needs on cn
CNBC
Jan 20, 2013 11:00pm EST
war ii. >> craig bovim is a local inhabitant and a surfer. he leads a group of concerned citizens who believe that chum makes sharks associate people with food. bovim thinks that may be why a shark attacked him three years ago. he remembers it every time he looks at his hands. >> and i can't describe the fear that went through me then. i mean, it's everybody's worst nightmare, and it was busy happening to me. >> the king of sushi is no longer treated like royalty. it is scraped and planed and then cut up into blocks. the industry's ability to supply the global market with inexpensive sushi has stoked demand, and that's created a mediterranean gold rush. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. precious commodities are, by definition, rare, valuable, and in high demand, and very often they're located in places that are difficult to reach and sometimes dangerous. this edition features stories that take us down into the world of sharks, deep into the heart of africa, and onto the high seas for a look at the dark side of big-time commercial fishing. we begin with gold. there
CNBC
Jan 18, 2013 1:00pm EST
reporter that has been covering this angle of the story. craig, good afternoon. these batteries are used in cell phones, model aircraft, automobiles. they are lighter, more powerful, easier to recharge. but it is not as if we have not known that they are prone to precisely the kinds of malfunctions that we seering on the 787s, is it? >> that's right. these things are -- they are literally everywhere in our lives. they make $4 billion lithium ion cells every year now and so, you know, i think the surprising thing is that we have a major aircraft that had a malfunction but all sort of low level malfunctions have been happening for years. it just hasn't reached the critical mass. >> is there something intrinsic to the science of lithium ion batteries that make them more prone to these kinds of catastrophic failures? >> absolutely. they are very small and very powerful. even the big batteries are a bunch of small batteries put together. if you get damage or defect, they put up a lot of energy quickly. >> is it smart to use them in something as complex and potentially life-impacting as a
CNBC
Jan 18, 2013 9:00am EST
grove, craig barrett, titans. go back to the steve jobs, talking about the stodgy intel. there's a funny moment where andy grove basically told him to shut up. but there is a sense that intel didn't move fast enough. at one point they're talking about, listen, our battery life will start exceeding the arm. put on your apple hat, all right? they would rather do business with samsung's chip, even though samsung is their biggest competitor, than switch to intel. >> what are we missing? there's uniform negativity here. we'll look back on it at end of this year and say, wait a second, we should have thought of that. >> don't throw that. >> that pc was bad, and they had every right to go out the window. all right, i've calmed down. >> there's no hope? >> anytime you have that budget, you can do it. i like stacy very much. it's a great manufacturer. there's hope. >> okay. >> there's hope. same level of hope. silver lining theory i call it. >> okay. when we come back, a wall street analyst known for being a longtime bear on netflix. and from textbook reynolds to the linked-in for college s
CNBC
Jan 21, 2013 11:00am EST
lot of family. you saw craig robinson, the brother of michelle obama, who is the basketball coach at oregon state. saw david axelrod, part of the president's political family. his wife susan behind him. it's a great moment for them as well. >> absolutely. and coming up, we're going to take a quick break as the president prepares to deliver his second inaugural address. we'll talk to a man who has been there and done that. john behr was a speechwriter for president clinton when he was sworn in for a second time and pel put pen to paper with him when cnbc's coverage of the second inauguration of barack obama continues. >>> the longest inaugural address at 8,445 words was given by william henry harrison. he died one month later of pneumonia believed to have been brought on by his prolonged exposure to harsh weather on his inauguration day. ♪ let's go. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new cadillac xts... another big night on the town, eh? ...and the return of life lived large. ♪ what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taki
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)